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Coming Out Stronger

Coming Out Stronger

In a year that has seen many of us adapt how we ride when faced with unforeseen circumstances, a new plan was needed when Kirsti Ruud woke to snowfall on the first morning of a bikepacking trip in her native Norway. But rather than any lingering sense of disappointment, the adverse weather conditions ultimately led to an experience that was not only breathtakingly beautiful but underlined the return on embracing the fickleness of forecasts.

Along with her companions Sindre Grønli and Øyvind Brenne Nordengen, the group decided on two separate rides in place of their planned overnight stop. Routes that would take them into the six biggest national parks in Norway and a landscape devoid of cars and buildings—a true wilderness of river valleys and mountain ridges, threaded through by the gravel roads they were riding.

Looking back on this experience, Kirsti reflects on the reasons she rides, how it can be rewarding to brave the elements and why the occasional challenge helps build resilience for when the randomness of life derails our best intentions.

 

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"Until 2018, I rode seriously. It was all about competition. I combined a little job here and there with my training, but then I accepted a full-time position with the National Cycling Federation. I was getting more interested in working with cyclists than being a cyclist myself, and the project I lead involves helping recovering drug addicts integrate back into society through cycling."

"So in place of a training plan, traveling and exploring have been more a part of my summers and falls for the last two years. When I can, I cycle the hour and a half each way to work. If the weather is good, there's no reason to sit in a car stuck in traffic. And because I’ve been working from home due to the pandemic, this year I've been cycling more than ever, enjoying riding my bike as much as I can within the restrictions."

"After I stopped competing, I hadn't ridden for months when I was invited to go to Iceland with Rapha. The trip was pretty amazing, and it just gave me a taste for different kinds of riding. So I asked them to let me know when the next big trip was planned and to count me in. George Marshall - the photographer on the Iceland shoot - had kept in touch, and he contacted me with this plan to ride in the north of Norway. But then he couldn't come over because of Covid, and my friend Marius Nilsen was invited to do the photography. He lives further north than Oslo and works for the National Parks."

 

"I was getting more interested in working with cyclists than being a cyclist myself."

"The idea was a two day ride with an overnight stop at a mountain hut. That's how we like to do things - carrying everything we need on our bikes. It’s what makes it a trip. And we'd come prepared with stud tires in case there was any ice. Usually I don't use these until December - even with regular tires, riding in snow isn't a problem - but we weren't sure whether it was going to be a mixture of rain and snow and wanted to be sure we didn't ruin our trip by crashing."

"But as we left Oslo to drive north, it began to snow really heavily. It was forecast, but not that much. Going to bed thinking it would melt the next day, we woke to find 15cm of fresh snow. Figuring that we wouldn't be able to get over to the cabin before it got dark, we decided on two separate rides over the two days."

"Setting off after breakfast, I was excited. I think the worst part of the year can be the fall when it’s dark and a little gloomy because you can't really tell the different textures from each other. But with the snowfall, the whole day was lit up and the mountains just looked so beautiful. The alternative would have been rain and fog."

"Riding through the snow-covered wilderness, you couldn’t help but notice the absence of cars and people. And even though we had a lot of wind - 17 metres per second which is enough to blow your bike over -  we were riding in bright sunshine. And stud tires can be annoyingly noisy on ice, but with the snow, they were silent—the best day to be up there."

"Before every trip, I'm kind of worried about my shape, hoping that I'll have a good day and not really struggle that much. But we were all happy and laughing and just going with the flow. The light was amazing when we reached the top of a mountain, and we just stood there, looking out over the landscape below, as the sun slowly sank behind the horizon."

 

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"I think the best rides I've had are when we've spontaneously come up with an idea. If you plan too much, and then the weather is bad, it can be so disappointing. It can take the charm away, and it's best not to be too uptight about how your ride will be. It’s OK to let go of plans and just get out there and ride—to go far or go short, to not really know where you'll end up."

"When I was competing, I had to ride regardless of the weather. Telling your trainer that you can't go out because it's raining and 5°C just isn't an option. Now that I don't have to ride, I do appreciate the good days when it’s warm and sunny. But you can enjoy amazing experiences because of the weather. If you have the right kit, then you're able to embrace changing and unpredictable conditions. And I do need some challenges once in a while where you feel like you're struggling because you kind of come out stronger at the other end."

"So I ride now because I want to ride. It’s my free time. My quiet time. An opportunity to reflect on things, for solving problems, to get out any frustration. Just being out on my bike gives me the space I need, and I come back feeling like a weight has been lifted. It's such an important aspect of the way I choose to live my life."

Words by Kirsti Ruud / Interview by Chris Hargreaves / Images by Marius Nilsen & Rapha

PURCHASE

Volume 11

The Modern House on wheels
Project type
Fixed on the horizon
Project type
Campomarino, my first ‘South’
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Far Ride Magazine is an independent publication documenting the people, journeys and stories related to cycling around the world.

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© Far Ride Magazine 2020

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